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Athabasca University

Dr. David Gregory

Professor, History and Humanities

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Education

  • Ph.D. Modern French History (Queen's)
  • Postgraduate Certificate in Education (London)
  • M.A. History of Ideas (Sussex)
  • B.A. English & History (Keele)

Introduction

I'm Professor of History and Humanities in the Centre for Humanities. I live and work in Athabasca. I am the program coordinator for the B.A. (Humanities), and the professor responsible for a wide range of undergraduate courses in the fields of communication studies, cultural studies, global studies, history, humanities, and music. My research area is the history of popular music, particularly the folksong revival in Canada and the United Kingdom. You can find lists of my publications and conference presentations below, as well as details of the radio shows I have developed for CKUA Radio. The biography section tells you something about my background and non-academic activities, and you can find a list of the courses that I teach in the courses section.

Being a professor in an open and distance learning university is an interesting challenge, in part because of the opportunity it gives me to spread my intellectual wings beyond my core discipline of European history, and in part because of the pedagogical opportunities provided by different communication technologies. Although a few of my courses are still print-based, all have online components, others have video components, and others use CDs, DVDs or radio broadcasts. I've always been a fan of radio, and I've been privileged to work with the CKUA Radio Network for over a dozen years. CKUA has regularly broadcast three program series that support my music courses, The Long Weekend, Bop to Rock, and The Rocky Road. These are now also available to students online.

As a historian and a folklorist, I am a member of the Canadian Historical Association, the Western Canadian Victorian Studies Association, the Folklore Studies Association of Canada, and the Canadian Society for Traditional Music. I have served as President of the Folklore Studies Association of Canada and I am a member of the board of directors of the Canadian Society for Traditional Music. For nine years (2002-2010) I edited the quarterly publication Canadian Folk Music/Musique folklorique canadienne on behalf of the latter society. This journal is available free online through the Athabasca University Press website; just click on www.canfolkmusic.ca.

Over the years my research interests have lain in three areas: the history of European socialist thought, local Alberta history, and the history of popular music, especially that of traditional folk music. My research is reflected in five books:

     Athabasca Landing: An Illustrated History (1986, rev. 1998)

     The Athabasca Ryga (1990)

     Victorian Songhunters: The Recovery and Editing of English Vernacular Ballads and Folk Lyrics, 1820-1883 (2006)

     The Late Victorian Folksong Revival: The Persistence of English Melody, 1878-1903 (2010)

     Bawdy Songbooks of the Romantic Period, Vol. 3 (2011)

I have also published a considerable number of articles in academic journals. For details of these see the publications section below. You will also find a list of the conference and other presentations I have delivered over the years.

At present I am researching the life and work of English folksong collector, editor and musician Lucy E. Broadwood, with the aim of writing two books about her. One is a biography, tentatively titled The Life and Times of Lucy Broadwood, 1858-1929. The other is a more specialized study of her achievements as a vernacular song collector and editor, Lucy Broadwood and English Folksong. Broadwood played a major role in the Folk-Song Society as its sometime Honorary Secretary and Journal editor, and I expect subsequently to expand my study of her career into a general history of the Edwardian phase of the English folk music revival. I have also done research on Frank Kidson, Maud Karpeles, A. L. Lloyd, and Peter Kennedy, and my long-term aim is to also write a book on the post-war folksong revival in England, to be titled English Folksong from Eel's Foot to Aldermaston. I am also very interested in the history of Canadian vernacular song, on which I have written several articles, and I am currently exploring further the work of British Columbia folksong collector Philip J. Thomas.

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Biography

I've been with Athabasca University since 1979, the year my wife Rosaleen and I moved to Alberta from Kingston, Ontario. Rosaleen and I now live in the town of Athabasca, and we have three grown-up daughters. Although we are both Canadian citizens, we emigrated from England, and our background, cultural and educational, is British, as you can easily tell as soon as we open our mouths!

I was born in Hitchin, Hertfordshire, England in 1945, and lived as a child in a Buckinghamshire village called Lane End, before moving to Cambridge, where I spent my teenage years. In those days my leisure hours were dominated by two passions: jazz and long-distance cycling. I did my first degree, an honours B.A. in English & History, at Keele University in Staffordshire. It was at Keele that I found two other loves of my life, folk music and my future wife Rosaleen, who just happened to be a very good folksinger. In 1967 I went to Sussex University, lived in a converted windmill in Lewes, and completed an M.A. in the History of Ideas. I'm still trying to get through the reading list that Peter Burke drew up for his graduate students! Then it was a year at Garnett College (University of London) doing a postgraduate Certificate in Education, before taking the plunge and emigrating to Canada.

In the fall of 1969 I arrived in Kingston, Ontario, to begin a Ph.D. in modern French history at Queen's University, working under the late Dr. John Sherwood (incidentally, the most brilliant academic I have ever encountered). I was associated with Queen's, either as a graduate student or as a sessional lecturer, for ten interesting and enjoyable years that included one year in Paris doing research for my doctoral dissertation. Teaching history at Queen's was a great apprenticeship, and I did eventually write my Ph.D. thesis too, on The Influence of French and English Socialism on the Early Thought of Friedrich Engels and Karl Marx, 1835-1847.

Then in 1979 my family and I took the train west to Alberta, and I began working as a professor for the fledgling Athabasca University, then little more than a pilot project operating out of rented buildings in an industrial suburb of Edmonton. I also tried my hand at university administration, serving as Dean of Arts from 1992 to 1995. The first course I developed, Humanities 248: From Sumer to Athens, is no longer offered, but we now have quite a range of History and Humanities courses, plus the beginnings of a Music Studies program. For details of the courses I currently coordinate, please consult the courses section. Since 1984 I have lived in the town of Athabasca, and Rosaleen (now retired) was for many years a partner in the local law firm of Kozina & Gregory. Rosaleen and I both play guitar and sing folksongs, and I also play clarinet (not very skillfully) in the Athabasca Community Band. We do sometimes find time for backpacking and for making music, and Athabasca is a great place for hiking in summer and Nordic skiing in winter.

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Radio Series (on the CKUA Radio Network)

Writers and Thinkers. Broadcast from October 1980 to September 1984.  This spoken-word series comprised seventy-four two‑and‑a‑half hour programs.

Ragtime to Rolling Stones (First Series). Broadcast from October 1981 to September 1997. The series comprised fifty-two one hour programs on the history of Anglo American popular music during the period 1900 to 1970.

Ragtime to Rolling Stones (Second Series). Broadcast on Radio Alberta CKUA from October 1984 to September 1997. This series comprised another set of fifty-two one hour programs on the history of Anglo American popular music during the period 1900 to 1970.

The Long Weekend. A forty-eight part radio series broadcast on Radio Alberta CKUA since October 1996. The series focuses on popular music of various genres from the decades between World War I and World War II.

Bop To Rock. A forty-eight part radio series broadcast on Radio Alberta CKUA since October 1997. The series focuses on popular music of various genres recorded during the years 1940-1960.

The Rocky Road: Presley to Punk. A forty-eight part radio series broadcast on Radio Alberta CKUA since November 1998. This series covers the history of Anglo-American popular music during the 1960s and 1970s.

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Publications [most recent first]

“Singing the Unspeakable: Soundings in English Minority Culture,” in Songs of People on the Move, ed. Thomas A. McKean, pp. 196-210. Trier, Germany: Wissenschaftlicher Verlag, 2012.

“Pioneers, Friends, Rivals: Social Networks and the English Folk-Song Revival, 1889-1904,” chapter 11 (pp. 171-187) in The Voice of the People: Writing the European Folk Revival, 1760-1914, ed. Matthew Campbell & Michael Perraudin. London: Anthem Press, 2012.

(edited) Bawdy Songbooks of the Romantic Period, Vol. 3. London: Pickering & Chatto, 2011. [Includes a 17 page introductory essay, “Songsters Flash, Funny and Facetious: An Introduction” (pp. xv-xxxi) and 126 pages of editorial notes (pp. 385-511).

“Five Songs”, Canadian Folk Music/Musique folklorique canadienne, 44.3 (Fall 2010), 17-23.

“British Columbia's Princeton Traditional Music Festival”, Canadian Folk Music/Musique folklorique canadienne, 44.1-2 (Spring/Summer 2010), 1 & 4-71.

“The Reconstruction of a Cultural Identity: Nationalism, Gender, and Censorship in the Late Victorian Folksong Revival in England”, Musicultures, Vol. 37 (2010), pp. 125-144.

“The Emergence of a Concept in Victorian England: From 'Old Ballads' and 'Songs of the Peasantry' to 'Folk-Song,'” in Ekhard John & Tobias Widmaier, eds., Vom Wunderhorn zum Internet: Perspektiven des Volkslied-Begriffs und der wissenschaftlichen Edition populärer Lieder, 19-30 (Trier, Germany: Wissenschaftlicher Verlag, 2010).

The Late Victorian Folksong Revival in England: The Persistence of Melody, 1878-1903. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press, 2010.

“Vernacular Folk Song on Canadian Radio: Recovered, Constructed, and Suppressed Identities”, in How Canadians Communicate III: Contexts of Canadian Popular Culture, ed. Bart Beaty, et al., 281-318. (Edmonton, Alberta: Athabasca University Press, 2010).

“Fakesong in an Imagined Village? A Critique of the Harker-Boyes Thesis”, in Canadian Folk Music/ Musique folklorique canadienne, 43.3 (Fall 2009), 18-26.

“Four Songs for the Environment”, Canadian Folk Music/Musique folklorique canadienne, Vol. 42.3 (Winter 2008-09), 22-25.

“Song Collecting in Newfoundland: Maud Karpeles, 1930”, Canadian Folk Music/Musique folklorique canadienne, Vol. 42.3 (Winter 2008-09), 1-13.

“Song Collecting in Newfoundland: Maud Karpeles, 1929”, Canadian Folk Music/Musique folklorique canadienne. Vol. 42.3 (Fall 2008), 12-25.

“Frank Kidson: The Formative Years, 1886-1890”, in Gordon Smith and Anna Hoefnagels, eds., Folk Music, Traditional Music, Ethnomusicology: Canadian Perspectives, Past and Present, 64-71 (Newcastle upon Tyne, U.K.: Cambridge Scholars Press, 2008).

“Before the Folk-Song Society: Lucy Broadwood and English Folk Song, 1884-97”, Folk Music Journal, Vol. 9, No. 3 (2008), pp. 372-414.

“Philip J. Thomas, 1921-2007”, Journal of American Folklore, Vol. 121, No. 480 (Spring 2008), 220-221.

“Philip J. Thomas, 1921-2007”, Folk Music Journal, Vol. 9, No. 3 (2008), pp. 492-494.

“Phil Thomas: An Odyssey in Song”, in Canadian Folk Music/Musique folklorique canadienne. Vol. 4, No. 1 (Spring 2007), pp. 5-40.

“Review of Andrew C. Rouse, The Remunerated Vernacular Singer: From Medieval England to the Post-War Revival”, in Folk Music Journal, Vol. 9, No. 2 (2007), pp. 267-269.

Victorian Songhunters: The Recovery and Editing of English Vernacular Ballads and Folk Lyrics, 1820-1883 (Lanham, MD & Oxford, U.K.: The Scarecrow Press, 2006). 447 pp. ISBN 0-8108-5703-0.

“Kenneth Peacock's Songs of the Newfoundland Outports”, in Canadian Folk Music/Musique folklorique canadienne, Vol. 40, No. 3 (Fall 2006), pp. 1-20.

“In the Shadow of Child: Other Victorian Perspectives on Ballad Editing”, in Roger deV. Renwick & Sigid Rieuwerts, eds., Ballad Mediations: Folksongs Recovered, Represented, and Reimagined, pp. 69-77 (Trier, Germany: Wissenschaftslicher Verlag Trier, 2006).

“Vernacular Song, Cultural Identity, and Nationalism in Newfoundland, 1920-1955”, History of Intellectual Culture, Vol 4, No. 1 (Summer 2004), pp. 1-22. Revised version reprinted in Canadian Folk Music/Musique folklorique canadienne. Vol 40, No. 2 (Summer 2006), pp. 1-14.

“'The Songs of the People for Me': The Victorian Rediscovery of Lancashire Vernacular Song”, Canadian Folk Music/Musique folklorique canadienne, 40.1 (Spring 2006), pp. 12-21.

“Newfoundland Traditional Song: The Legacy from the English West Country”, Canadian Journal for Traditional Music/Revue de musique folklorique canadienne, Vol 31 (2004), pp. 50-65 [actually published Spring 2005]

“Roving Out: Peter Kennedy and the BBC Folk Music and Dialect Recording Scheme, 1952-1957”, in Folk Song: Tradition, Revival, and Re-Creation, edited by Ian Russell & David Atkinson (Aberdeen: Elphinstone Institute, University of Aberdeen, 2004), pp. 218-240.

“Helen Creighton and the Traditional Songs of Nova Scotia”, Canadian Folk Music/Bulletin de musique folklorique canadienne, Vol 38, No. 2 (Summer 2004), pp. 1-17.

“The Creighton–Senior Collaboration, 1932-51”, Canadian Folk Music/Bulletin de musique folklorique canadienne, Vol 38, No. 2 (Summer 2004), pp. 18-35.

Review of Songs of the Sea: Traditional Folk Songs and Narratives from the Dr. Helen Creighton Collection (Dartmouth, NS: Helen Creighton Folklore Society, 2003), in Canadian Folk Music/Bulletin de musique folklorique canadienne, Vol 38, No. 2 (Summer 2004), pp. 39-41.

Review of Helen Creighton: Canada's First Lady of Folklore, by Clary Croft (Halifax, NS: Nimbus, 1999), in Canadian Folk Music/Bulletin de musique folklorique canadienne, Vol 38, No. 2 (Summer 2004), pp. 41-42.

Review of The Flowering Thorn: International Ballad Studies, by Thomas A. McKean, ed. (Logan, Utah: Utah State University Press, 2003), Ethnologies, Vol 26, No. 2 (2004), pp. 315-317.

“Obituary: Alan Lomax (1915-2002)”, Folk Music Journal, Vol 8, No. 4 (2003), pp. 548-552.

“A Conversation with Kiran Ahluwalia”, Canadian Folk Music/Bulletin de musique folklorique canadienne, Vol 37, No. 4 (Winter 2003), pp. 1-7.

“Review of Ronald D. Cohen, Rainbow Quest: The Folk Music Revival and American Society, 1940-1970”, Labour/Le Travail, No. 52 (Fall 2003), pp. 301-303.

“Forgotten Folklorist: Charlotte Burne and Shropshire Song”, B.C. Folklore: Journal of the British Columbia Folklore Society, No. 18 (October 2003), pp. 4-13.

“The Elisabeth Greenleaf Collection at MUNFLA: An Overview”, Canadian Folk Music/Bulletin de musique folklorique canadienne, Vol 37, No. 3 (Fall 2003), pp. 10-16.

“Two Seminal New Books: The English Traditional Ballad & Rainbow Quest”, Canadian Folk Music/Bulletin de musique folklorique canadienne, Vol 37, No. 3 (Fall 2003), pp. 17-20.

(with Rosaleen Gregory) “Before Newfoundland: Maud Karpeles in Canada”, Canadian Folk Music/Bulletin de musique folklorique canadienne, Vol 37, No. 1 (Spring 2003), pp. 1-12.

“Ballad of the Month/A Ballad Revisited”, Canadian Folk Music/Bulletin de musique folklorique canadienne, Vol 37, No. 1 (Spring 2003), pp. 28-32.

(with Rosaleen Gregory) “Jewels Left in the Dung-hills: Broadside and other Vernacular Ballads Rejected by Francis Child”, Canadian Journal for Traditional Music/Revue de musique folklorique canadienne, Vol 29 (2002), pp. 69-80 [actually published Spring 2003].

“Alan Lomax: A Life in Folk Music”, Canadian Folk Music/Bulletin de musique folklorique canadienne, Vol 36, No. 4 (Winter 2002), pp. 5-17.

“Lomax on Canadian Folk Music”, Canadian Folk Music/Bulletin de musique folklorique canadienne, Vol 36, No. 4 (Winter 2002), pp. 18-21.

“Sampling The Alan Lomax Collection”, Canadian Folk Music/Bulletin de musique folklorique canadienne, Vol 36, No. 4 (Winter 2002), pp. 26-40.

“Some Other Field Recordings by Alan Lomax”, Canadian Folk Music/Bulletin de musique folklorique canadienne, Vol 36, No. 4 (Winter 2002), pp. 41-44.

“Alan Lomax: The European Years, 1950-58”, B.C. Folklore: Journal of the British Columbia Folklore Society, No. 17 (Fall 2002), pp. 9-35.

“Moira Cameron: Northern Balladeer”, Canadian Folk Music/Bulletin de musique folklorique canadienne, Vol 36, No. 3 (Fall 2002), pp. 2-11.

“Fonds Edith Fowke”, Canadian Folk Music/Bulletin de musique folklorique canadienne, Vol 36, No. 3 (Fall 2002), pp. 26-29.

“In Memoriam: John Hasted, 1921-2002”, Canadian Folk Music/Bulletin de musique folklorique canadienne, Vol 36, No. 2 (Summer 2002), pp. 3-8.

“Time to Move Webwards?”, Canadian Folk Music/Bulletin de musique folklorique canadienne, Vol 36, No. 2 (Summer 2002), pp. 36-40.

“Review of Pamela Pilbeam, French Socialists Before Marx”, Labour/Le Travail, No. 49 (Spring 2002), pp. 331-333.

“Lomax in London: Alan Lomax, the BBC and the Folk Song Revival in England, 1950-1958”, Folk Music Journal: The Journal of Traditional Song, Music & Dance, Vol 8, No. 2 (2002), pp. 136-169.

“Maud Karpeles, Newfoundland, and the Crisis of the Folk Song Revival, 1924-1935”, Newfoundland Studies, Vol 16, No. 2 (Fall 2000), pp. 151-165.

“Starting Over: A. L. Lloyd and the Search for a New Folk Music, 1945-49”, Canadian Journal for Traditional Music/Revue de musique folklorique canadienne, Vol 27 (1999/2000), pp. 20-43.

“The BBC and Folk Music Broadcasting”, in Root & Branch 2: Everybody Swing: The Fifties, 1947-63, pp. 10-11. [multi-media package, including CD and booklet of essays] London: English Folk Dance and Song Society, 2000.

“Transatlantic Troubadours: Pete Seeger, John Hasted and the English Folk Song Revival”, The Canadian Folk Music Bulletin, 33.3 (September 1999), pp. 18-21.

Report on TIP research project # PJET 211: Combining Radio and Multimedia (internal document, Athabasca University, 1999).

“A Multimedia Approach to Teaching Blues History”, Proceedings of the IASTED '98 Conference on Computers and Advanced Technology in Education (Anaheim & Zurich: IASTED/ACTA Press, 1998), pp. 29-32.

“In Memoriam R2Rs, 1981-1997”, The Canadian Folk Music Bulletin, 24 (1998), pp. 14-28.

(with Kit H. Leung) “Using Multimedia and the Internet to Teach the History of Popular Music”, CADE/ACED '98 Proceedings, Vol 2, pp. 223-226.

“From Radio to Real Audio: A Changing Partnership”, CADE/ACED '98 Proceedings, Vol 1, pp. 137-140.

“A. L. Lloyd and the English Folk Song Revival, 1934-44”, Canadian Journal for Traditional Music/Revue de musique folklorique canadienne, Vol 25 (1997), pp. 14-28.

(edited) The Athabasca Ryga. Vancouver: Talonbooks, 1990.

Athabasca Landing: An Illustrated History. Athabasca, Alberta: Athabasca Historical Society, 1986. (principal author of collaborative work). Revised edition, 1998.

“Karl Marx's and Friedrich Engels' Knowledge of French Socialism in 1842-43”, Historical Reflections, Vol. 10, No. 1, Spring 1983, pp. 143-193.

“The Influence of French Socialism on the Thought of Karl Marx, 1843-45”, paper delivered at the Sixth Annual Conference of the Western Society for French History (November 1978), and published in the Proceedings of the Sixth Annual Meeting of the Western Society for French History (1978), pp. 242-251.

“French Ideals of the Corporate Society”, comments on Louis de Bonald and on Jean Paul Sartre published in Proceedings of the Fifth Annual Meeting of the Western Society for French History (1977), pp. 190-197.

“David Hume”, “Friedrich Schiller”, “Karl Marx”, “Georges Sorel”, & “Jean Paul Sartre”, in James Stayer, ed., Intellectual Origins of the Contemporary World. Kingston, Ont.: Department of History, Queen's University, 1976.

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Conference and Other Presentations [most recent first]

“Woody Guthrie and the Second English Folksong Revival, 1944-64”, presented at Woody at 100: the Guthrie Legacy Conference, University of Alberta/Smithsonian Folkways, Edmonton, 9-10th August, 2012.

“Lucy Broadwood and the Folk-Song Society, 1903-1914”, paper presented at the annual conference of the the International Council for Traditional Music, held at Memorial University, St. John's, Newfoundland, in July 2011.

“The Songs of Western Canada”, chair of a workshop hosted on this theme at the annual conference of the International Council for Traditional Music, held at Memorial University, St. John's, Newfoundland, in July 2011.

“The Pioneer Experience Reflected in Western Canadian Vernacular Song”, delivered at the annual conference of the Folklore Studies Association of Canada, held at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, 12th-15th May 2011.

“Sea Songs from Two Oceans: A Comparative Analysis of Maritime Songs from the Coasts of Yorkshire and British Columbia”, delivered at the annual conference of the International Ballad Commission, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 5th-10th July, 2010.

“National Song and National Identity: A Transatlantic Comparison”, delivered at the annual conference of the Canadian Society for Traditional Music, University of Regina, Saskatchewan, 3rd-6th June, 2010.

“'He was not a gentleman!': Social Networks and the First Folksong Revival”, delivered at the annual conference of the Folklore Studies Association of Canada, as part of the congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, Concordia University, Montreal, 28th-30th May, 2010.

“The Reconstruction of a Cultural Identity: Nationalism, Gender, and Censorship in the Late Victorian Folksong Revival in England”, paper delivered to the International Conference on Musical Heritage: Movements and Contacts, Faculty of Music, Université de Montréal, October 29-November 1, 2009.

“An Opportunity Fumbled: Francis James Child and the Late Victorian Folksong Revival in England”, presented at the annual conference of the Folklore Studies Association of Canada, as part of the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, Carleton University, Ottawa, 23th-25th May, 2009.

“The Mining Songs of British Columbia: Exploring the P. J. Thomas Collection”, presentation to the Athabasca University Research Forum, Edmonton Learning Centre, 20th February, 2009.

“Frank Kidson: The Missing Years, 1891-98”, presented at the annual conference of the Canadian Society for Traditional Music, St. Mary's University, Halifax (14th-16th November, 2008).

“Broadside Balladry and Censorship in the Victorian Vernacular Song Revival”, presented to the Conference of the Victorian Studies Association of Western Canada, University of Winnipeg, October 14th-16th, 2008.

“Lucy Broadwood and Frank Kidson: Aspects of a Collaboration, 1891-1899”, presentation in the Traditional Song Forum series at Whitby Folk Week, Whitby, England, 18-22 August 2008.

“Maud Karpeles in Canada and Newfoundland, 1929-30”, presentation in the Traditional Song Forum series at Whitby Folk Week, Whitby, England, 18-22 August 2008.

“The Mining Songs of British Columbia: Exploring the P. J. Thomas Collection”, presentation in the Traditional Song Forum series at Whitby Folk Week, Whitby, England, 18-22 August 2008.

“The Mining Songs of British Columbia: Exploring the P. J. Thomas Collection”, delivered at the International Ballad Conference, Cardiff University, Wales, UK, 28th July-2nd August 2008.

“Sounds of the English Counties: Lucy Broadwood and the Late Victorian Folksong Revival, 1884-1893”, paper presented at the annual conference of the Canadian Society for Traditional Music, held at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, November 2-4th, 2007.

“Folk Music on Canadian Radio: Recovered and Constructed Identities”, paper presented at a conference on 'How Canadians Communicate', held at The Banff Centre, Alberta, October 10th-14th, 2007.

“Pioneers, Friends, Rivals: Social Networks and the English Folksong Revival, 1889-1904”, paper delivered at a conference on 'Voices of the People: The European Folk Revival', held at the University of Sheffield, U.K., September 6th-8th, 2007.

“Singing the Unspeakable: from 'Sheath and Knife' to 'O Bondage, Up Yours!'”, paper delivered at the annual conference of the International Ballad Commission, Kyle of Lochalsh, Scotland, August 29th-September 2nd, 2007.

“Ballad Origins and the Value of Broadside Balladry: The Victorian Debate”, paper presented to the International Congress of Medieval Studies, University of Western Michigan, Kalamazoo, MI, 10-13th May, 2007.

“Frank Kidson: The Formative Years, 1886-1890”, paper presented to the annual conference of the Canadian Society for Traditional Music, held at Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, on November 3rd-5th, 2006.

“The Emergence of a Concept in Victorian England: From 'Old Ballads' and 'Songs of the Peasantry' to 'Folk-Song'”, paper presented to the annual conference of the Kommission für Volksdichtung (International Ballad Commission), held in Freiburg i. Br., Germany, on 3rd – 7th April 2006.

“W. E. Axon and Working Class Song in Victorian Lancashire”, paper presented at the annual conference of the Canadian Society for Traditional Music, held in New Westminster, B.C., on November 4th - 6th, 2005.

“Myth or History? Broadside Balladry and the Search for Robin Hood, 1795-1888”, paper delivered to the annual conference of the Folklore Studies Association of Canada, Universit× de Ste. Anne, Pointe Eglise, Nova Scotia, 19-22nd May, 2005.

“'The songs of the people for me': Rediscovering Lancashire Vernacular Song in the mid-Victorian Era”, paper presented at the annual conference of the Canadian Society for Traditional Music, York University, Toronto, 29-31st October, 2004.

“Newfoundland Traditional Song: The Legacy from Georgian and Victorian England”, paper delivered at the Victorian Studies Association of Western Canada conference on Victorian Canada, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, 14-16th October, 2004.

“Thomas Wright and the Early History of English Vernacular Song”, paper delivered at the annual conference of the Canadian Historical Association, at the Congress of the Humanities & Social Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, June 5th, 2004.

“Deloney Redux: The Percy Society and the Rediscovery of Thomas Deloney”, paper delivered at the annual conference of the Association of Canadian College and University Teachers, Congress of the Humanities & Social Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, 31st May, 2004.

“Rediscovering the Regions: the Cultural Geography of the Victorian Vernacular Song Revival”, paper delivered at the annual conference of the Folklore Studies Association of Canada, University of Winnipeg, 27th May, 2004.

“Singing the Unspeakable: from 'Sheath and Knife' to 'O Bondage, Up Yours!'”, paper delivered at the annual conference of the Canadian Society for Traditional Music, Athabasca University, Athabasca, AB, 1st November, 2003.

“Before Sharp: The Lucy Broadwood Diaries, 1882-1903”, paper delivered at the Cecil Sharp Centenary Conference, Ilminster, Somerset, UK, 21st August, 2003.

“A Legacy of Song: Cultural Identity and Nationalism in Newfoundland, 1920-1955”, paper delivered at the British World Conference, University of Calgary, AB, 12th July, 2003.

“In the Shadow of Child: Victorian Perspectives on Ballad Editing”, paper delivered at the International Ballad Conference, University of Texas, Austin, TX, 25th June, 2003.

“Peeling the Onion: Songs of the West and the People Who Sang Them”, paper delivered at the annual conference of the Folklore Studies Association of Canada, Halifax, NS, May 31st, 2003.

“Forgotten Folklorist: Charlotte Burne and Shropshire Song”, paper delivered at the annual conference of the Canadian Society for Traditional Music, Memorial University, St. John's, Nfld, November 2nd, 2002.

“Redefining a Genre: Francis Child and the Traditional Ballad”, paper delivered at the annual conference of the Canadian Historical Association, Toronto, Ont., May 27th, 2002.

“Jewels Left in the Dung-hills: Broadside and other Vernacular Ballads Rejected by Francis Child”, joint paper with Rosaleen Gregory, delivered at the annual conference of the Folklore Studies Association of Canada, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ont., May 23-25th, 2002.

“Fakesong in an Imagined Village? A Critique of the Harker-Boyes Thesis”, paper presented at the annual conference of the Folklore Studies Association of Canada, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ont, May 23-25th, 2002.

“Before Newfoundland: Maud Karpeles in Canada and New England, 1929”, paper presented with Rosaleen Gregory to the Annual Conference of the Canadian Society for Traditional Music, University of British Columbia, October 26-28, 2001.

“English Sources of The English and Scottish Popular Ballads”, paper presented to the annual conference of the Canadian Society for Traditional Music, University of British Columbia, October 26-28, 2001.

“Forgotten Newfoundland Songs: Gleanings from the Karpeles Collection”, paper presented jointly with Rosaleen Gregory to the Annual Conference of the Folklore Studies Association of Canada, Quebec, 28th May, 2001.

“Towards an Online Resource for Teaching Canadian Traditional Music”, paper delivered at the annual conference of the Folklore Studies Association of Canada, Quebec, 27th May, 2001.

“Maud Karpeles, Newfoundland, and the Crisis of the Folksong Revival, 1924-1935”, paper presented to the Toronto 2000 Music Conference, 4th November, 2000.

“The BBC As Collector: The Folk Music and Dialect Recording Scheme, 1952-57”, paper presented to the Conference of the Folklore Studies Association of Canada, Edmonton, 27-29th May, 2000.

“The Making of a Collector: Peter Kennedy, 1922-52”, paper presented to the Conference of the Canadian Society for Traditional Music, Calgary, 29-31st October, 1999.

“The First Folk Song Revival: An Ambiguous Legacy”, Keynote Address delivered to the Conference of the Canadian Society for Traditional Music, Calgary, 29-31st October, 1999.

“Before Skiffle: The BBC and the Birth of the Folksong Revival in England, 1938-56”, paper presented at the Northwest Conference on British Studies, Edmonton, Alberta, September 30th-October 2nd, 1999.

“Lomax in London: Alan Lomax and the Folk Song Revival in England, 1950-1958”, paper presented at the annual conference of the Canadian Society for Traditional Music, Winnipeg, Manitoba, 30th October-1st November, 1998.

“Muzzled Rover? Peter Kennedy, the BBC, and English Folksong, 1949-1958”, paper presented to the International Conference on Folksong: Tradition and Revival, held at the University of Sheffield, England, July 10-12th, 1998.

“A Multimedia Approach to Teaching Blues History”, joint presentation with Kit H. Leung at the International Association for Technology in Development Conference on Computers and Advanced Technology in Education, held in Cancun, Mexico (June 1998).

“From Radio to Real Audio: A Changing Partnership”, paper presented at the annual conference of the Canadian Association for Distance Education (Banff, Alberta), May 1998.

“Using Multimedia and the Internet to Teach the History of Popular Music”, joint presentation with Kit H. Leung (Concordia University) at the annual conference of the Canadian Association for Distance Education (Banff, Alberta), May 1998.

“Echoes Across the Atlantic: North American Influences on the English Folk Song Revival before 1960”, paper delivered at the annual conference of the Canadian Society for Traditional Music, Vancouver Island, 28th-30th November 1997.

“Eel's Foot to Aldermaston: The English Folk Song Revival, 1938-58”, public lecture delivered at the English Folk Song and Dance Society, London, England, 28th February, 1997.

“French Socialism and Karl Marx, 1843-46”, paper presented to the Ontario/Michigan Society for French Historical Studies, First Annual Meeting (March 1979).

“The Influence of French Socialism on the Thought of Karl Marx, 1843-45”, paper delivered at the Sixth Annual Conference of the Western Society for French History (November 1978).

“French Ideals of the Corporate Society”, comments on Louis de Bonald and on Jean Paul Sartre. Annual Conference of the Western Society for French History (November 1977).

“Marx and Engels on Industrialisation”, paper presented to the Ontario Teacher's Conference, Kingston, Ont. (October 1977)

“Marx and French Marxists on the State”, paper presented to the Ontario Teacher's Conference, Kingston, Ont. (October 1975).

Updated November 17 2014 by Student & Academic Services

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